Frozen Pipe Damage

When water freezes, it expands. That’s why a can of soda explodes if it’s put into a freezer to chill quickly and forgotten. When water freezes in a pipe, it expands the same way. If it expands enough, the pipe bursts, water escapes and serious damage may result.

WHY PIPES BURST

Surprisingly, ice forming in a pipe does not typically cause a break where the ice blockage occurs. It’s not the radial expansion of ice against the wall of the pipe that causes the break. Rather, following a complete ice blockage in a pipe, continued freezing and expansion inside the pipe causes water pressure to increase downstream — between the ice blockage and a closed faucet at the end. It’s this increase in water pressure that leads to pipe failure. Usually the pipe bursts where little or no ice has formed. Upstream from the ice blockage the water can always retreat back towards its source, so there is no pressure build-up to cause a break. Water has to freeze for ice blockages to occur. Pipes that are adequately protected along their entire length by placement within the building’s insulation, insulation on the pipe itself, or heating, are safe.

When is it Cold Enough to Freeze?

When should homeowners be alert to the danger of freezing pipes? That depends, but the “temperature alert threshold” is 20 degrees F.  This threshold is based upon research conducted by the Building Research Council at the University of Illinois. Field tests of residential water systems subjected to winter temperatures demonstrated that, for un-insulated pipes installed in an unconditioned attic, the onset of freezing occurred when the outside temperature fell to 20 degrees F or below. However, freezing incidents can occur when the temperature remains above 20 degrees F. Pipes exposed to cold air (especially flowing air, as on a windy day) because of cracks in an outside wall or lack of insulation are vulnerable to freezing at temperatures above the threshold.

MITIGATING THE PROBLEM

Water freezes when heat in the water is transferred to subfreezing air. The best way to keep water in pipes from freezing is to slow or stop this transfer of heat. Ideally, it is best not to expose water pipes to subfreezing temperatures, by placing them only in heated spaces and keeping them out of attics, crawl spaces and vulnerable outside walls. In new construction, proper placement can be designed into the building.  In existing houses; a plumber may be able to reroute at-risk pipes to protected areas, although this may not be a practical solution. If the latter is the case, vulnerable pipes that are accessible should be fitted with insulation sleeves or wrapping (which slows the heat transfer), the more insulation the better. It is important not to leave gaps that expose the pipe to cold air. Hardware stores and home centers carry the necessary materials, usually in foam rubber or fiberglass sleeves. Better yet, plumbing supply stores and insulation dealers carry pipe sleeves that feature extra-thick insulation, as much as 1 or 2 inches thick. The added protection is worth the extra cost. Cracks and holes in outside walls and foundations near water pipes should be sealed with caulking to keep cold wind away from the pipes. Kitchen and bathroom cabinets can keep warm inside air from reaching pipes under sinks and in adjacent outside walls. It’s a good idea to keep cabinet doors open during cold spells to let the warm air circulate around the pipes. Electric heating tapes and cables are available to run along pipes to keep the water from freezing. These must be used with extreme caution; follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully to avoid the risk of fire, and check to make sure the product conforms to UL 2049. Tapes and cables with a built-in thermostat will turn heat on when needed. Tapes without a thermostat have to be plugged in each time heat is needed, and may be forgotten.

LETTING THE WATER RUN

Letting a faucet drip during extreme cold weather can prevent a pipe from bursting. It’s not that a small flow of water prevents freezing; this helps, but water can freeze even with a slow flow. Rather, opening a faucet will provide relief from the excessive pressure that builds between the faucet and the ice blockage when freezing occurs. If there is no excessive water pressure, there is no burst pipe, even if the water inside the pipe freezes. A dripping faucet wastes some water, so only pipes vulnerable to freezing (ones that run through an unheated or unprotected space) should be left with the water flowing. The drip can be very slight. Even the slowest drip at normal pressure will provide pressure relief when needed. Where both hot and cold lines serve a spigot, make sure each one contributes to the drip, since both are subjected to freezing. If the dripping stops, leave the faucet(s) open, since a pipe may have frozen and will still need pressure relief.

IF YOU SUSPECT A FROZEN PIPE

If you open a faucet and no water comes out, don’t take any chances. Call a plumber. If a water pipe bursts, turn off the water at the main shut-off valve (usually at the water meter or where the main line enters the house); leave the faucet(s) open until repairs are completed. Don’t try to thaw a frozen pipe with an open flame; as this will damage the pipe and may even start a building fire. You might be able to thaw a pipe with a hand-held hair dryer. Slowly apply heat, starting close to the faucet end of the pipe, with the faucet open. Work toward the coldest section. Don’t use electrical appliances while standing in water; you could get electrocuted.

GOING ON A TRIP OR VACATION HOMES

When away from the house for an extended period during the winter, be careful how much you lower the heat. A lower temperature may save on the heating bill, but there could be a disaster if a cold spell strikes and pipes that normally would be safe, freeze and burst. A solution is to drain the water system. This is the best safeguard. With no water in the pipes, there is no freezing. This remedy should be considered even when the homeowner is not leaving but is concerned about a serious overnight freeze. To drain the system, shut off the main valve and turn-on every water fixture (both hot and cold lines) until water stops running. It’s not necessary to leave the fixtures open, since the system is filled mostly with air at that point and not subject to freezing. When returning to the house, turn on the main valve and let each fixture run until the pipes are full again.

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Aquire Restoration, Inc. Merger in Madison, WI

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Aquire Restoration of Madison, Inc. “Acquires” Capital Remediation, Inc.

Madison, WI – July 1, 2016 – Substantial growth and a friendship amongst owners generates a merger of two restoration companies to create one with a management hierarchy that provides the highest level of customer service in the restoration industry.

Aquire Restoration of Madison, Inc. has been in operation for five years and has seen unprecedented growth thanks to following their core values and beliefs.  In order to continue operating with customer satisfaction as the number one priority, a merger was required to combine industry expertise, assets, and to continue putting our customers/clients’ needs first.

The management team will consist of: Jeff Edmunds; President of Aquire Restoration of Madison, Inc., Josh Duggan (formerly President of Capital Remediation, Inc.) will assume the Vice-President role and Jason Schmitt will continue to be the General Manager of Operations.

“You’re only as good as your last project,” says Mr. Edmunds, “but we want to be remembered by our customers and clients as providing a level of service that has never been seen in our industry.”

“Many restoration companies have gone out of business or scaled back their operations in the last year while, Aquire Restoration, Inc. and Capital Remediation, Inc. have grown by leaps and bounds and continue to grab market share. This merger is the perfect meshing of two companies that have the same strategies, but with slightly different strengths.  We believe we are creating one company to serve all the restoration needs of the residents and businesses of Southern WI,” says Mr. Duggan

Also, with this merge comes a new facility. Due to the number of employees, assets and operations that will be combined together, neither current facility would be sufficient to house the new larger company under either existing roof.  As of July 5, 2016, Aquire Restoration of Madison, Inc. will operate solely from 925 Applegate Road, Madison, WI 53713.  Office hours will continue to be 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, with, as always, emergency services available 24 hours a day to respond to any type of property damage.

“The increased staff will allow us to create a second-shift team to provide a higher level of customer service while not charging after-hours services calls until after 10 p.m. – which is unprecedented in our industry,” says Mr. Schmitt.

Our new facility, being the most centralized location out of any restoration company in the area is located on the south side of the beltline between Park Street and Fish Hatchery Road.  “This location will allow us to have the latest technology and processes in the industry” says Mr. Edmunds, “Quality isn’t expensive…It’s priceless!”

Contact:

Jeff Edmunds, President

jedmunds@aquirerestoration.com

925 Applegate Road

Madison, WI 53713

Office: 608.222.9222

Toll-Free: 877.267.9287

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Emergency Board Up Services

We’re always here to serve our customers in their time of need and that is evident by this recent service call we received!! This car went through the front glass at a local dollar tree store and we were onsite within the hour, from the initial call, so they can resume business!  We not only boarded up the broken windows but we cleaned up all the glass and shelving that was damaged.  Call us in when you need help…we’ll be there for you!  Check out our work by visiting our Facebook page or our Website!

If you are in need of help with any type of project please contact one of our offices below:

Office Locations:

Cedar Falls, Iowa – 319.266.6136
Kaukauna, Wisconsin – 920.759.9090
Oshkosh, Wisconsin – 920.688.2000
Madison, Wisconsin – 608.222.9222

24/7 Emergency Service – Toll-Free – 877.267.WATR (9287)

Storm Damage: New Siding & Roof

The Aquire Team was called in to a job in  Appleton, WI after a storm. At this home,  we put new siding it, along with a new roof on the house and garage.

The homeowner wanted to take care of the garage by painting it at a later time. We were happy to oblige him, we will do as much of the work as the client wants but if they want to do things themselves then we will work with them! We are happy to!

The finished product looks amazing! Great job team!

Check out our Facebook Page, Website and Twitter for more pics, updates and how-to’s!

 

 

Water Loss Commercial Property

A commercial property suffered a WATER loss just a few weeks prior. The property was for sale, so we had to come in quickly do the job right and be able to get it done before it went to closing.

Frozen pipes burst inside the vacant building, and sat for an unknown period of time. The water had wicked up the drywall at least two feet and had to be removed. We started the mitigation immediately and are in process of reconstruction.

Here are a few pictures of the job before we finished (finished pics coming soon).

Rossi Collage

CHECK OUT OUR FACEBOOK PAGE FOR THE FINAL PRODUCT AND MANY MORE BEFORE AND AFTER PHOTOS!

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR ALL THE SERVICES WE CAN OFFER YOU!

Aquire Restoration, Bathroom Remodel

This homeowner was looking for an updated bathroom. After working within the space we came in and made a few changes.

Keeping the bathtub we replaced the surround. We also ripped off the white board paneling throughout the bathroom. With new paint, vanity unit, and more we really gave this bathroom an updated modern and beautiful look!

Aquire has so much to offer, check out our FACEBOOK page and WEBSITE for more information on how we can BEST service you!

Bathroom Update

Water Restoration: Frozen Pipes, BURST!

We just wrapped up on a project that started in November. Frozen pipes had burst in the second story level which caused extensive water damage in this rental property. The family had left for the weekend, and unfortunately turned their furnace off. Upon their return the water had seeped from the 2nd level bathroom, down into the kitchen and leaving traces of water in the basement as well.
Initially we removed water from the premise, dried the structure, removed wet building materials. Then started the rebuild.

We were able to save the baseboards in the upstairs bathroom but needed to replace the vinyl flooring.

In the kitchen we initially pulled the cabinets off the wall, ripped out the drywall and insulation and replaced it. We also replaced the kitchen ceiling made it a drop ceiling and installed faux-tin ceilings!